Report on the Situation of Cambodian Migrant Workers – January-April 2012

LimMony

During the first four months of 2012, the number of complaints for interventions from migrants’ families was increased up to 5 times, compared to the same period of last year (the number of complainst ADHOC received during the the first four months of 2012 is 141 cases, while it was only 23 cases for the same period last year).

Migration occured in two forms: legal and illegal migrations. General challenges faced by the two forms of migration include forced overwork, little or no rest time, untreated illnesses, torture, severe physical assault, underpayment, threats, being jailed, being forced to continue work illegally and the cut-off of relationship with family members. Among the 141 cases, some were from Malaysia, Thailand, South Africa, China, Singapore, Japan, Fiji and so on.

JOINT STATEMENT: The Culture of Impunity and Violence Must Stop

Following the recent shootings, evictions and arrests, in particular relating to citizens and activists defending land, labor and natural resources rights, 139 Cambodian and international civil society organizations issue a Joint Statement on Impunity and Violence.

Joint open letter to the Prime Minister: Vacate convictions against BKL human rights defenders

International and regional NGOs issue a Joint Open Letter to Prime Minister Hun Sen, expressing their “grave concerns regarding the arbitrary arrest and mistreatment” of 13 Boeung Kak Lake residents; “strongly condemn[ing] their prosecution on trumped-up charges and summary trial”; and urging the Cambodian government to “vacate the convictions and drop . . . unfounded charges against [all] Human Rights Defenders and unconditionally release them immediately”.

STATEMENT: ADHOC Condemns the Unfair Conviction of 13 Boeung Kak Residents

The Cambodian Human Rights and Development Association (ADHOC) condemns the conviction of 13 women embroiled in a land dispute with CPP Senator Lao Meng Khin’s Shukaku Inc. The Boeung Kak residents were sentenced to two-and-a-half years in jail yesterday by the Phnom Penh Municipal Court on charges of rebellion (article 504 of the Penal Code) and illegal occupation of land (article 34 of the Land Law). Five of them had their sentences suspended to two years, and another to one year. All were sent to Prey Sar prison immediately after sentencing. The women were arrested on 23 May as they were peacefully protesting against the destruction of their homes by Shukaku Inc. and attempting to rebuild them.

Authorities Must Drop Charges against Boeung Kak Residents and Seek Fair Resolution of their Dispute with Shukaku Inc.

The Cambodian Human Rights and Development Association (ADHOC) condemns the arrest of 13 female residents of the Boeung Kak community yesterday as they were peacefully protesting against the destruction of their homes and attempting to rebuild them. This latest development illustrates the fact that Cambodian authorities deliberately let the situation deteriorate at Boeung Kak Lake. As the 13 women are sent to court, ADHOC calls on relevant authorities to drop any charges against them and seek fair resolution of this long-running dispute.

Report on Land and Housing Rights in 2011 (English version)

2011 has seen a sharp increase in the number of economic land concessions granted by the Cambodian Government to private companies. Some protected areas have also been expropriated or transferred from state public land to state private property. In 2011, the Royal Government issued 123 Sub-Decrees to grant economic land concessions to private companies, amounting to a total area of 751,882 hectares.

STATEMENT: Cambodian Authorities Must Put an End to the Cycle of Violence Related to Land and Natural Resources Rights

The Cambodian Human Rights and Development Association (ADHOC) strongly condemns the shooting dead of a 14-year old girl yesterday, relating to a long-standing land dispute in Kratie province. Heng Chentha was fatally wounded by armed forces in Broma village, Kampong Domrey commune, Chhlong district, as villagers were protesting in Snuol district against forced eviction from the homes and farmland they had occupied for years. Cambodian authorities claim that the disputed land is state-owned; however, evidence suggests that it may have been granted as a concession to Casotim, a Russian company which plans to set up a rubber plantation.